The Digitalist Team
August 18, 2022

Community-driven companies, the next stage in the evolution of organizational structure

Even though most software development organizations are still using a “traditional” organizational structure, there is an increasing number of corporations who want to challenge this way of doing things. Software developers are looking for more challenges, more freedom, flexibility, and a mission to identify with, alongside other work benefits. Hence, we now see more and more community-driven companies emerging globally, a trend which represents a new wave in the evolution of organizational structure, as well as a response to the requirements of today’s developers.

In this article, we will elaborate on the make-up, benefits, and characteristics of community-driven organizations, thereby also shedding light on some significant changes in the organizational structure of MNDWRK.

What are community-driven organizations?

Communities, and individuals within a community, are centered around a common belief, behavior, and a shared cause. They usually take on a common identity, although it is not a prerequisite to identify with this to become a member of the community.

When you hear the phrase “community-driven company”, try to think about Slack, Notion, and Zapier as an example. While the traditional company model is about selling to an audience and pushing ideas at them, a community-driven organization pulls ideas from its community members, who are also the consumers of the product. This model is based on the active participation of the community members, who dedicate their time and their knowledge to the improvement of the software.

While traditional organizations have their own developer team who create marketable software from A to Z, community-driven companies build a community first and develop software with that community’s cooperation. The difference between the two models is profound, and can be absolutely vital to the success of software development organizations.

In the long run, the objective of all commercial organizations is to be profitable. However, how exactly they define success, and what kind of strategies they use to achieve this goal, depends on the management of the company.

What is a next-gen community-driven company about?

Essentially, community-driven companies aim to revolutionize how software is made through a decentralized virtual organization made up of various experts and technologists, who ultimately want more than just another regular job.

Community-driven companies take a holistic approach to the overall management of the corporation. Instead of having a dedicated team to cater to the different needs of the organization, members take care of most customer-facing activities, like support, development, sales, and marketing. By incentivizing communication and cooperation among members, the company can make sure its operation will go smoothly.

As a result, community-driven companies generally involve being:

  • Fair, democratic, and at all times transparent;
  • Decentralized, autonomous, and completely virtual;
  • Tokenized and co-owned by their members; and
  • Quite simply, a better company to work for.

This is why working with a next-gen community-driven organization offers technologists a totally different kind of working experience.

Software development teams in community-driven companies

To begin with, working for a community-driven company is an entirely new, “cherry-pick” kind of work experience. 

Community members can easily create work squads to work on joint projects with their friends, ex-colleagues, and former classmates. It is up to them who they work with. Creating a squad on a community platform only takes a few clicks, and essentially it functions just the same as if they are launching their own custom development company.

In the case of community-driven companies, it is in the interest of developers to enhance the software by taking maximum advantage of their know-how. This is so because they are also part of the equation as active users, marketers, and service providers. It is in their interests for the system to function seamlessly, as intended.

What does it mean to be a community member for such an organization?

Being a community member involves building an international career, surfing from project to project, learning new skills, and taking breaks when needed. You will be part of a vivid, autonomous, and passionate community that gets the job done while constantly exceeding expectations. 

Thanks to the decentralized and completely virtual structure, you will be part of a great team that you love, find mentors to learn from, and will be able to harness all advantages a peer community has to offer.

Software developers working with a community-driven organization usually get shares from the company: an additional and transparent financial benefit that goes hand-in-hand with a clear career path. 

You don’t have to worry about strictly abiding by defined working hours, putting up with colleagues you don’t like, or asking for permission to join another project you prefer. By being a community member, you have the flexibility of a freelancer, the responsibilities of a senior developer, and the benefits of a shareholder.

How do community-driven companies stand out among other body leasing service providers?

In order to understand how community-driven organizations stand out from product-led companies, you need to understand the limitations of the latter model. 

Most IT agencies provide what they call “flexible” services via their own employees: a rather rigid and expensive approach that can never exceed headcount limitations. These companies need to attend to all of the responsibilities that coincide with the management of employees, like recruiting, interviewing, onboarding, professional and personal development, and continuous supervision. These activities, the concomitant financial expenses, and the pressure to grow their headcount with talented employees are making the development and expansion of these IT organizations slower, more difficult, and more expensive. In the long run, this model becomes relatively unsustainable.

In contrast, community-driven companies facilitate a vivid community with a veritable ocean of IT experts and freelancers, where availability and capacity are not bound by employee headcounts. IT professionals can join projects from all corners of the world, resulting in a truly international and transformative experience, focusing 100% on the satisfaction of all users.

Organizations like this, including MNDWRK, are pioneering a new form of company structure. By design, community-driven companies are agile and flexible, capable of providing the IT workforce with what customers need while at the same time creating never-seen-before conditions.

What does the structure of a community-driven company look like?

Each community-driven company consists of two core entities: the orchestrator and the community. 

The orchestrator

The orchestrator is responsible for sharing all available projects with the community and deciding which one is the right squad to get the job done in a fast, efficient, and cost-effective manner. They are also responsible for providing robust HR and career support to each and every community member.

The orchestrator has the following responsibilities:

  • Problem-solving and decision-making;
  • Planning;
  • Delegation;
  • Task management;
  • Managing the group and the individuals;
  • Communication management;
  • Meetings;
  • Conflict management.

The community

The community is made up of various experts and specialists in all major fields including Mobile & Web development, Big Data, DevOps, Business Automation, Customer Experience, CMS implementation, and more. They are responsible for project development, testing, deployment, and delivery.

The two in combination

Via flexible models, the two combined can offer a great list of services to the company’s customer base to suit their every need, such as project outsourcing, team augmentation, BOT (build - operate - transform) and remote workforce recruitment.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are several advantages of working with a community-driven company as opposed to product-led or body leasing service providers. This revolutionary organizational structure enables all professionals to focus on what they are the best at while enjoying several other benefits, like flexibility, enhanced work-life balance, and company shares.

The two core entities of a community-based organization (CBO) are the orchestrator and the community, which are jointly responsible for the satisfaction of the community members and the users, while at the same time attending to different workflows within the ecosystem.

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August 18, 2022

Community-driven companies, the next stage in the evolution of organizational structure

Even though most software development organizations are still using a “traditional” organizational structure, there is an increasing number of corporations who want to challenge this way of doing things. Software developers are looking for more challenges, more freedom, flexibility, and a mission to identify with, alongside other work benefits. Hence, we now see more and more community-driven companies emerging globally, a trend which represents a new wave in the evolution of organizational structure, as well as a response to the requirements of today’s developers.

In this article, we will elaborate on the make-up, benefits, and characteristics of community-driven organizations, thereby also shedding light on some significant changes in the organizational structure of MNDWRK.

What are community-driven organizations?

Communities, and individuals within a community, are centered around a common belief, behavior, and a shared cause. They usually take on a common identity, although it is not a prerequisite to identify with this to become a member of the community.

When you hear the phrase “community-driven company”, try to think about Slack, Notion, and Zapier as an example. While the traditional company model is about selling to an audience and pushing ideas at them, a community-driven organization pulls ideas from its community members, who are also the consumers of the product. This model is based on the active participation of the community members, who dedicate their time and their knowledge to the improvement of the software.

While traditional organizations have their own developer team who create marketable software from A to Z, community-driven companies build a community first and develop software with that community’s cooperation. The difference between the two models is profound, and can be absolutely vital to the success of software development organizations.

In the long run, the objective of all commercial organizations is to be profitable. However, how exactly they define success, and what kind of strategies they use to achieve this goal, depends on the management of the company.

What is a next-gen community-driven company about?

Essentially, community-driven companies aim to revolutionize how software is made through a decentralized virtual organization made up of various experts and technologists, who ultimately want more than just another regular job.

Community-driven companies take a holistic approach to the overall management of the corporation. Instead of having a dedicated team to cater to the different needs of the organization, members take care of most customer-facing activities, like support, development, sales, and marketing. By incentivizing communication and cooperation among members, the company can make sure its operation will go smoothly.

As a result, community-driven companies generally involve being:

  • Fair, democratic, and at all times transparent;
  • Decentralized, autonomous, and completely virtual;
  • Tokenized and co-owned by their members; and
  • Quite simply, a better company to work for.

This is why working with a next-gen community-driven organization offers technologists a totally different kind of working experience.

Software development teams in community-driven companies

To begin with, working for a community-driven company is an entirely new, “cherry-pick” kind of work experience. 

Community members can easily create work squads to work on joint projects with their friends, ex-colleagues, and former classmates. It is up to them who they work with. Creating a squad on a community platform only takes a few clicks, and essentially it functions just the same as if they are launching their own custom development company.

In the case of community-driven companies, it is in the interest of developers to enhance the software by taking maximum advantage of their know-how. This is so because they are also part of the equation as active users, marketers, and service providers. It is in their interests for the system to function seamlessly, as intended.

What does it mean to be a community member for such an organization?

Being a community member involves building an international career, surfing from project to project, learning new skills, and taking breaks when needed. You will be part of a vivid, autonomous, and passionate community that gets the job done while constantly exceeding expectations. 

Thanks to the decentralized and completely virtual structure, you will be part of a great team that you love, find mentors to learn from, and will be able to harness all advantages a peer community has to offer.

Software developers working with a community-driven organization usually get shares from the company: an additional and transparent financial benefit that goes hand-in-hand with a clear career path. 

You don’t have to worry about strictly abiding by defined working hours, putting up with colleagues you don’t like, or asking for permission to join another project you prefer. By being a community member, you have the flexibility of a freelancer, the responsibilities of a senior developer, and the benefits of a shareholder.

How do community-driven companies stand out among other body leasing service providers?

In order to understand how community-driven organizations stand out from product-led companies, you need to understand the limitations of the latter model. 

Most IT agencies provide what they call “flexible” services via their own employees: a rather rigid and expensive approach that can never exceed headcount limitations. These companies need to attend to all of the responsibilities that coincide with the management of employees, like recruiting, interviewing, onboarding, professional and personal development, and continuous supervision. These activities, the concomitant financial expenses, and the pressure to grow their headcount with talented employees are making the development and expansion of these IT organizations slower, more difficult, and more expensive. In the long run, this model becomes relatively unsustainable.

In contrast, community-driven companies facilitate a vivid community with a veritable ocean of IT experts and freelancers, where availability and capacity are not bound by employee headcounts. IT professionals can join projects from all corners of the world, resulting in a truly international and transformative experience, focusing 100% on the satisfaction of all users.

Organizations like this, including MNDWRK, are pioneering a new form of company structure. By design, community-driven companies are agile and flexible, capable of providing the IT workforce with what customers need while at the same time creating never-seen-before conditions.

What does the structure of a community-driven company look like?

Each community-driven company consists of two core entities: the orchestrator and the community. 

The orchestrator

The orchestrator is responsible for sharing all available projects with the community and deciding which one is the right squad to get the job done in a fast, efficient, and cost-effective manner. They are also responsible for providing robust HR and career support to each and every community member.

The orchestrator has the following responsibilities:

  • Problem-solving and decision-making;
  • Planning;
  • Delegation;
  • Task management;
  • Managing the group and the individuals;
  • Communication management;
  • Meetings;
  • Conflict management.

The community

The community is made up of various experts and specialists in all major fields including Mobile & Web development, Big Data, DevOps, Business Automation, Customer Experience, CMS implementation, and more. They are responsible for project development, testing, deployment, and delivery.

The two in combination

Via flexible models, the two combined can offer a great list of services to the company’s customer base to suit their every need, such as project outsourcing, team augmentation, BOT (build - operate - transform) and remote workforce recruitment.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are several advantages of working with a community-driven company as opposed to product-led or body leasing service providers. This revolutionary organizational structure enables all professionals to focus on what they are the best at while enjoying several other benefits, like flexibility, enhanced work-life balance, and company shares.

The two core entities of a community-based organization (CBO) are the orchestrator and the community, which are jointly responsible for the satisfaction of the community members and the users, while at the same time attending to different workflows within the ecosystem.

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